Coins from 35-27 BC
This category covers the coins minted from the defeat of Sextus Pompeius and the fall of Lepidus in 35 BC, and until the ascension of Octavian as Augustus in 27 BC.

While the official coins of the late Republic were still minted under the control of the moneyers, it became more and more common practice for imperators to coin their own money to pay their troops and for propaganda purposes.
35-27 BC
(1) Marcus Antonius
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An AR Denarius struck 32 B.C. in Military Mint
Obverse: ANT AVG III VIR RPC

Reverse: LEG V

Diameter: 17.3 mm
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 2.73 g
30
No references provided for this coin
(2) Marcus Antonius
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An AR Denarius struck 32-31 BC in Military Mint
Obverse: galley right, mast with banners at prow, ANT·AVG / III ·VIR·R·P·C

Reverse: legionary aquila between two standards, LEG X?

Diameter: 17 mm
Die Orientation: 0 H
Weight: 3.52 g

moving mint in Greece (maybe Patrae?)

Crawford 544/?
(3) Marcus Antonius
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An AR Denarius struck 32-31 BC in Military Mint
Obverse: galley right, mast with banners at prow, ANT·AVG / III ·VIR·R·P·C

Reverse: legionary aquila between two standards, LEG_II ?

Diameter: 18 mm
Die Orientation: 0 H
Weight: 2.9 g

moving mint in Greece (maybe Patrae?)

Crawford 544/14?
(4) Marcus Antonius
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An AR Denarius struck 32-31 BC in Military Mint
Obverse: Praetorian ship right, with scepter tied with fillet on prow; above, ANT AVG; below, III. VIR. R.P.C.

Reverse: Aquila (eagle) between two standards; around, LEG XVII CLASSICAE

Diameter: -
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 3.27 g
Interesting so-called Legionary issue struck shortly before the decisive naval battle of Actium in 31 BC.

Quality VF-F
Crawford 544/10, CRI 373, Sydenham 1238, RSC 50
(5) Marcus Antonius
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An AR Denarius struck 32-31 BC in Patrai | Military Mint
Obverse: ANT AVG III VIR R P C; Galley right, mast with banners at prow. Bankers mark above galley

Reverse: LEG V; Legionary eagle between two standards

Diameter: 17 mm
Die Orientation: 6 H
Weight: 3.7 g
No notes for this coin
Crawford 544/18
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An AR Quinarius struck 27-29 BC in Rome?
Obverse: CAESAR IMP•VII – Head of Octavian.

Reverse: ASIA RECEPTA – Victory draped, standing looking left, holding wreath in right hand. On cista mystica between two snakes

Diameter: 13.5 mm
Die Orientation: 0 H
Weight: 1.45 g

This issue was struck to commemorate that the province of Asia had accepted Octavian's victory over Marcus Antonius in 30 BC. But where Aegyptus was a client kingdom, and therefore could be captured per se, Asia was a veteran province already, so the regular CAPTA reverse was probably deemed unsuitable, and the RECEPTA reverse was used instead.

RIC 276, RSC 14
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An AR Quinarius struck 29-27 BC in Rome?
Obverse: CAESAR IMP VII, Bare head of Octavian facing right

Reverse: ASIA RECEPTA, Victory standing facing left, holding wreath and palm, on top of cista mystica, serpents at left and right

Diameter: 15 mm
Die Orientation: 1 H
Weight: 1.66 g
Uncertain Italian mint, probably Rome, maybe Brundisium, Ephesus in Anatolia has also been suggested. RIC finds the later improbable and says it was probably not a mint outside of Rome.

RSC has this to say:

"The subjection of the Province of Asia occurred in B.C. 30."
RIC I (2nd Ed.) Augustus 276; RSC I Augustus 14; BMC 647
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An Fourree Denarius struck 32-29 BC in Italia
Obverse: Bust of Venus facing right, wearing stephane and necklace

Reverse: CAESAR DIVI F, Octavian in military dress, cloak flying behind, advancing left, right arm extended, left hand holding transverse spear

Diameter: 17 mm
Die Orientation: 6 H
Weight: 2.54 g
Uncertain Italian mint, maybe Rome or Brundisium per RIC.


The below quote from forumancientcoins.com puts the coin in context:

"In July 32 B.C., Octavian illegally obtained Antony's will and exposed it to the Roman public: it promised substantial legacies to Antony's children by Cleopatra and left instructions for shipping his body to Alexandria for burial. Rome was outraged, and the Senate declared war against Cleopatra (an important distinction, because Octavian did not want the Roman people to consider it a civil war). Octavian's forces decisively defeated the forces of Antony and Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium in Greece in September 31 B.C. In 30 B.C., Octavian chased Antony and Cleopatra to Egypt where they committed suicide. Octavian became master of the Roman world."
RIC I (2nd Ed.) Augustus 251; RSC I Augustus 70
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An AR Denarius struck 29-27 BC in Italia
Obverse: Bare head of Octavian facing right

Reverse: IMP CAESAR, Facing head of Octavian on ithyphallic boundary stone of Jupiter Terminus, winged thunderbolt below

Diameter: 20 mm
Die Orientation: 5 H
Weight: 3.53 g
banker's punch marks

Uncertain mint in Italy, maybe Rome or Brundisium per RIC.

The following quote from forumancientcoins.com puts this coin in context:

"this propaganda referred to Octavian's re-establishment of boundaries in the east after the battle of Actium and review of the client kingdoms established by Marc Antony (in particular return of Roman territory from Cleopatra and her children)"
RIC I (2nd Ed.) Augustus 269a; RSC I Augustus 114
(10) Octavian
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An AR Denarius struck 30-29 BC in Italy | Rome?
Obverse: Bare head of Octavian facing right

Reverse: IMP CAESAR, A naval and military trophy consisting of the weapons and armor of a defeated enemy on a tree trunk on top of a prow of a captured galley with crossed anchor and rudder

Diameter: 21 mm
Die Orientation: 1 H
Weight: 3.71 g
CNG notes: "The reverse of this denarius depicts a Roman naval and military trophy. Known in Latin as a tropaeum from the Greek τρόπαιον, it typically consisted of the helmet, cuirass, and shields of a defeated enemy arranged on a tree trunk with arm-like branches.

Arranged around its base were additional arms and sometimes bound captives. Here, in place of the additional arms and/or captives the trophy sits on the beak (rostrum) of an enemy warship with a rudder and anchor at its base.

This denarius was part of a series of aurei and denarii that were struck between the autumn of 30 BC and 29 BC and which conveyed a general message of victory and re-foundation.

Sear associated this denarius with a contemporary aureus showing on its reverse a similar trophy housed in a tetrastyle temple decorated with a triskeles in its pediment. The obverse of that coin, a bust of Diana Siciliensis, led him to argue that the aureus commemorated Octavian's important victory over Sextus Pompey at the Battle of Naulochus in 36 BC.

The reverse of this denarius, however, does not specify a particular victor. The most likely possibility is that it commemorates Agrippa's victory over Antony and Cleopatra at Actium the previous September, the final triumph for Octavian, the undisputed master of the Roman Empire."
RIC I (Second Edition) 265a; RSC 119
(11) Octavian
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An AR Denarius struck 30-29 BC in Rome?
Obverse: head right

Reverse: Octavian’s Actian arch surmounted by large statue of Octavian in facing triumphal quadriga; IMP·CAESAR

Diameter: -
Die Orientation: -
Weight: -
aut. 30 - sum. 29 BC
RIC I 267, SRCV I 1558, RSC I 123, Sear CRI 422, BMCRR 4348