Pautalia — A settlement in Thrace
Pautalia was founded as a Thracian settlement in the 5th-4th centuries BC, and the Romans developed it into an important stronghold, balneological resort and trade junction in the 1st century AD, when it was administratively part of Macedonia.

It became a major religious and administrative centre of the Byzantine Empire, and subsequently the Second Bulgarian Empire after Kaloyan conquered the area between 1201 and 1203.

Modern location: Kyustendil, Bulgaria
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/Caracalla_Pautalia.jpg
An AE unit struck 211-217 AD in Pautalia
Obverse: laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right from behind; AV K M AVP__ANTΩNI

Reverse: coiled serpent, head right; ΟVΛΠΙΑC ΠΑVΤΑΛΙΑC

Diameter: 17 mm
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 3.79 g
No notes for this coin
var. Moushmov 4260 (larger coin)
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/Commodus_Pautalia.jpg
An AE unit struck 176-192 AD in Pautalia
Obverse: laureate head right; AV KAI K_OMOΔOC

Reverse: snake coiled around altar, head right; OYΛΠIA_C ΠAYTAΛIAC

Diameter: -
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 3.4 g
No notes for this coin
RPC IV.1, 8935 (temporary); Ruzicka, Pautalia 249, Cop 698,
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/Untitled(9).jpg
An AE unit struck 177-192 AD in Pautalia
Obverse: AV KAI MAP AV KOMOΔOC?, Head of Commodus facing right, wearing laurel wreath

Reverse: OYLΠIAC ΠAYTAΛIAC, Amphora

Diameter: 20 mm
Die Orientation: 6 H
Weight: 5.09 g
I'm fairly certain of the obverse inscription as it's relatively clear up to KOMODOC, but there's no room for anything after that.
Unpublished
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/Faustina_II_Pautalia_Hera_1.jpg
An AE unit struck 161-175 AD in Pautalia
Obverse: draped bust right; ΦAYCTEI_NA CEBACTH

Reverse: Hera standing left holding patera and scepter; OYΛΠIAC ΠA_YTAΛIAC

Diameter: 22 mm
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 7.77 g
No notes for this coin
Ruzicka 68 var. (obv. legend break)
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/717_Faustina_Pautalia.jpg
An AE unit struck 161-175 AD in Pautalia
Obverse: draped bust right; ΦAYCTEINA__CEBACTH

Reverse: Hera standing left holding patera and scepter; OYΛΠIAC ΠA_YTAΛIAC

Diameter: 22 mm
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 6.1 g
No notes for this coin
Ruzicka 68 var. (obv. legend break)
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/Faustina_II_Pautalias_Demeter.jpg
An AE unit struck 161-175 AD in Pautalia
Obverse: draped bust right; ΦAYCTEI_NA CEBACTH

Reverse: Demeter seated left, holding corn ears and torch; OYΛΠIAC ΠA_YTAΛIAC

Diameter: 22 mm
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 6.31 g
No notes for this coin
Ruzicka 87a; Varbanov 4472
(7) Geta
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/aIMG_4258-horz.jpg
An AE unit struck 198-209 AD in Pautalia
Obverse: Π CEΠTI ΓETAC KAI, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust of Geta right.

Reverse: ΠAVTA-ΛIΩTΩN, Thanatos standing slightly right, resting on lighted torch.

Diameter: 22.4 mm
Die Orientation: 12 H
Weight: 6.96 g
Geta (7 March 189 – 26 December 211) was Roman emperor with his father Septimius Severus and older brother Caracalla from 209, when he was named Augustus like his brother, who had held the title since 198. Severus died in 211, and although he intended for his sons to rule together, they proved incapable of sharing power, culminating with the murder of Geta in December of that year. On his coins, Caracalla, who became Augustus in 198, was shown with a wreath of laurels, while Geta remained bareheaded until he himself became Augustus in 209. Thanatos, in ancient Greek religion and mythology, the personification of death. Thanatos was the son of Nyx, the goddess of night, and the brother of Hypnos, the god of sleep. He appeared to humans to carry them off to the underworld when the time allotted to them by the Fates had expired. His touch was gentle, likened to that of his twin brother Hypnos (Sleep). Violent death was the domain of Thanatos' blood-craving sisters, the Keres, spirits of slaughter and disease. Thanatos was once defeated by the warrior Heracles, who wrestled him to save the life of Alcestis, the wife of Admetus, and he was tricked by Sisyphus, the king of Corinth, who wanted a second chance at life. Thanatos plays a prominent role in two myths. Once when he was sent to fetch Alkestis (Alcestis) to the underworld, he was driven off by Herakles in a fight. Another time he was captured by the criminal Sisyphos (Sisyphus) who trapped him in a sack so as to avoid death. In Greek vase painting Thanatos was depicted as a winged, bearded older man, or more rarely as a beardless youth. He often appears in a scene from the Iliad, opposite his brother Hypnos (Sleep) carrying off the body of Sarpedon. In Roman sculptural reliefs he was portrayed as a youth holding a down-turned torch and wreath or butterfly which symbolised the soul of the dead.
Ruzicka 829; Varbanov 5465.
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/1027_Domna_Pautalia.jpg
An AE unit struck 211-217 AD in Pautalia
Obverse: draped bust right; IOVΛIA_ΔOMNA CEB

Reverse: lit altar between two torches with entwined snakes; ΠΑVΤΑΛIΩTΩN

Diameter: -
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 7.9 g
tooled
Ruzicka, Pautalia 498; Gorny & Mosch, Auction 122,1737