Maxentius Emperor of the Roman Empire from 306 to 312.
Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius Augustus was Roman Emperor from 306 to 312. He was the son of former Emperor Maximian and the son-in-law of Emperor Galerius.

When Constantius Chlorus died in 306, his son Constantine was crowned emperor and subsequently accepted by Galerius into the tetrarchy as Caesar. This set the precedent for Maxentius' accession later in the same year.

The latter part of his reign was preoccupied with civil war, allying with Maximinus II against Licinius and Constantine. The latter defeated him at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge in 312, where Maxentius, with his army in flight, perished by drowning in the Tiber River.
Maxentius
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An AE Follis struck 308-309 AD in Rome
Obverse: IMP C MAXENTIUS PF AVG, Laureate bust right

Reverse: Hexastyle temple, with wreath in pediment and containing Roma seated facing on throne, head left, holding globe and spear; shield to right

Diameter: 0 mm
Die Orientation: 0 H
Weight: 6.26 g
No notes for this coin
RIC VI 202a
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An AE Follis struck AD 306-312 in Ostia
Obverse: IMP C MAXENTIUS P F AVG, Laureate head right

Reverse: AETERNITAS AVG N, The Dioscuri standing facing each other, each holding sceptre and bridles of their horse

Diameter: 24 mm
Die Orientation: 11 H
Weight: 7.15 g
On the reverse of this fine coin we can see the Dioscuri, Castor and Pollux, stood side-by-side with their horses. They were the sons of Zeus, and came to be immortalised through a tragic story. The ‘Heavenly twins’ were inseparable from birth, Castor becoming renowned for his skill at horsemanship (though both brothers rode swift white horses), whilst Pollux excelled at boxing. They lived the normal life of any great hero of their time, voyaging with the Argonauts and taking part in the Calydonian boarhunt (depicted on the silver denarius recently added to my collection). The trouble for the Dioscuri began when they got into a quarrel with their cousins Idas and Lynkeus. There are a couple of differing explanations for the fallout; one involving girls and the other involving cattle! In a confrontation with the cousins Castor was mortally wounded by Idas, whereas Pollux had the benefit of being immortal and so safe from injury. Pollux avenged his brother by killing Lynkeus with his spear, whilst Zeus hurled a thunderbolt at Idas (thanks dad!) With both cousins dead, Pollux returned to Castor, who was now at the point of death. Weeping, Pollux begged Zeus to allow him to die with his brother, so the god offered him a choice. Either Castor went to Hades while he himself took his place among the gods on Olympos, or Castor could share his immortality, with the caveat that the brothers spent alternate days in the Underworld, and the other days on Olympos with the gods. Pollux chose the latter without hesitation, and Zeus immortalised the brothers in the stars as the constellation Gemini, the Twins, to commemorate their mutual devotion. The Dioscuri were important to the Romans, since they fought with them in a great battle against the Latins in 499 (or 496) BC. As soon as the battle was over they appeared in the Forum at Rome, their horses bathed in sweat, and announced the resounding victory. The temple of Castor was erected nearby to commemorate this event, three columns of which still stand today. The Dioscuri were the protectors of travellers, particularly sailors, and so it is no coincidence that this coin was minted in Ostia, an important harbour city of ancient Rome.
RIC 35; Sear 14975
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An AE Follis struck 309-312 AD in Ostia
Obverse: IMP C MAXENTIVS P F AVG, Head of Maxentius facing right, wearing laurel wreath

Reverse: VICTORIA AETERNA AVG N, Victory wearing drapery, advacing left, holding wreath and palm; MOSTP in exergue

Diameter: 30 mm
Die Orientation: 5 H
Weight: 6.56 g
MOSTP=Moneta (money) from the first officina in Ostia

The fact that the flan is enormous and the coin has been struck perfectly centered with the full detail including the dotted border on both sides, leads me to believe it's a trial strike of some sort.
RIC VI Ostia 54
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An AE Follis struck 309 A.D. in Ostia
Obverse: IMP C MAXENTIVS P F AVG, laureate head right

Reverse: AETE-RNITAS A-VGN, Castor and Pollux standing facing each other, each leaning on sceptre and holding bridled horse.

Diameter: 24.8 mm
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 5.6 g
MOSTS
RIC VI 14
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An AE Follis struck 308-310 AD in Rome
Obverse: IMP C MAXENTIVS P F AVG, laureate head right

Reverse: CONSERV VRB SVAE, Roma seated facing, head left, holding flobe, in hexastyle temple with peaked roof, wreath in pediment. Mintmark RBT

Diameter: -
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 5.8 g
No notes for this coin
RIC 210; Sear 14987.
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/625_Maxentius_Ostia.jpg
An AE Follis struck 309-312 AD in Ostia
Obverse: laureate head right; IMP C MAXENTIVS P F AVG

Reverse: Castor and Pollux, each with star above cap, chlamys over shoulder, leaning on scepter with outer arm, holding bridled horse with inner hand; AETE_RNITAS__AVG N / MOSTS

Diameter: -
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 6.25 g
No notes for this coin
RIC 35; Cohen 5; Sear 14975
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/335_Maxentius_Rome.jpg
An AE Follis struck 308-310 AD in Rome
Obverse: laureate head right; IMP C MAXENTIVS P F AVG

Reverse: Roma seated left within hexastyle temple, holding globe and sceptre, a shield to her right and rear; wreath in thympanon, 2 Victories on the corners; CONSERV_VRB SVAE / RBQ

Diameter: -
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 7.51 g
No notes for this coin
RIC VI Rome 210
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An AE Follis struck 312 BC in Ostia
Obverse: IMP C MAXENTIVS P F AVG, laureate head right.

Reverse: AETERNITAS AVG N, the Dioscuri standing facing each other, their horses between; MOSTS in exergue.

Diameter: 24.49 mm
Die Orientation: 12 H
Weight: 6.4 g
"Ostia" (plur. of "ostium") is a derivation of "os", the Latin word for "mouth". At the mouth of the River Tiber, Ostia was Rome's seaport. Ostia housed a late imperial mint; this coin of Maxentius was struck there. On the reverse of this fine coin we can see the Dioscuri, Castor and Pollux, stood side-by-side with their horses. They were the sons of Zeus, and came to be immortalised through a tragic story. The ‘Heavenly twins’ were inseparable from birth, Castor becoming renowned for his skill at horsemanship (though both brothers rode swift white horses), whilst Pollux excelled at boxing. They lived the normal life of any great hero of their time, voyaging with the Argonauts and taking part in the Calydonian boarhunt.
RIC 35.
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An AE Follis struck 309-312 AD in Ostia
Obverse: IMP C MAXENTIVS P F AVG, Head of Maxentius facing right, wearing laurel wreath

Reverse: AETERNITAS AVG N, The Dioscuri Castor and Pollux standing facing each other, each holding scepter and holding a horse by the bridle; MOSTQ in exergue

Diameter: 25 mm
Die Orientation: 6 H
Weight: 6.05 g
No notes for this coin
RIC VI Ostia 35
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An AE Follis struck 309 AD in Aquileia
Obverse: IMP MAXENTIVS P F AVG CONS II, Bust of Maxentius facing right, wearing laurel wreath, and Consular robes; holding eagle-tipped scepter

Reverse: CONSERV VRB SVAE, Roma seated facing left, in hexastyle temple, holding globe and scepter; shield at side; crescent in pediment

Diameter: 27 mm
Die Orientation: 12 H
Weight: 6.2 g
No notes for this coin
RIC VI Aquileia 125
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An AE Follis struck 307 AD in Aquileia
Obverse: IMP C MAXENTIUS PF AUG / Laureate Maxentius facing right

Reverse: CONSERV URB SUAE / Roma in quadrastyle temple, AQΓ in exergue

Diameter: -
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 6.84 g
No notes for this coin
RIC VI 113