Faustina I Empress of the Roman Empire from 138 to 140.
Annia Galeria Faustina was a Roman empress and wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius.

As a private citizen, she married Antoninus Pius between 110 and 115, and Faustina and Antoninus had a very happy marriage. Faustina bore Antoninus four children, two sons and two daughters. After Antoninus Pius' accession to the principate, the couple never left Italy.

Faustina's personal style was evidently much admired and emulated. Her distinctive hairstyle, consisting of braids pulled back in a bun behind or on top of her head, was imitated for two or three generations in the Roman world.
Faustina I
Epithet: Major ("the Elder")
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/12.jpg
An AR Denarius struck 138-141 AD in Rome
Obverse: DIVA AVG FAVSTINA, draped bust right

Reverse: AETERNITAS, Aeternitas or Ceres standing, holding torch and sceptre

Diameter: -
Die Orientation: -
Weight: -
Faustina I, wife of Antoninus Pius, died 141 AD.
RIC 346b.1.
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/FaustinaSenior1.jpg
An AR Denarius struck an unknown year in Rome
Obverse: DIVA FAVSTINA

Reverse: AVGVSTA, Vesta standing left, holding simpulum & palladium

Diameter: 17 mm
Die Orientation: 0 H
Weight: 31 g
No notes for this coin
RIC:368 SEAR:4587
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/Auction_Pic_(Obv_and_Rev)(11).jpg
An AR Denarius struck After AD 141 in Rome
Obverse: DIVA FAVSTINA, bust draped right.

Reverse: CONSECRATIO, peacock walking right, head left.

Diameter: 18 mm
Die Orientation: 5 H
Weight: 3.54 g
No notes for this coin
RIC 384 (Pius); Sear 4594
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/IMG_0370x.jpg
An AE As struck 147-161 AD in Rome
Obverse: draped bust right; DIVA__FAVSTINA

Reverse: Vesta standing left with palladium and torch; AVG_V_STA / S C

Diameter: 27 mm
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 9.26 g
My first As.
RIC 1178
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/IMG_0376x.jpg
An AR Denarius struck 147-161 AD in Rome
Obverse: draped bust right; DIVA__FAVSTINA

Reverse: veiled Ceres standing left, holding torch, raising robe; AVG_VSTA

Diameter: 18 mm
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 3.21 g
No notes for this coin
RIC III 362, BMCRE IV 421, RSC II 104, SRCV II 4584
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/IMG_0380x.jpg
An AR Denarius struck 147-161 AD in Rome
Obverse: draped bust right; DIVA FAV_STINA

Reverse: Vesta standing left, holding patera over lit altar and Palladium; AVGV_STA

Diameter: 17 mm
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 3.19 g
No notes for this coin
RIC III 370, RSC II 116, BMCRE IV 440
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/Auction_Pic_EDIT_2_(Obv_and_Rev)(0).jpg
An AR Denarius struck AD 140-141 in Rome
Obverse: DIVA FAVSTINA, diademed and draped bust right

Reverse: AVGVSTA, Ceres standing left, holding long torch in her right hand, and supporting drapery in left

Diameter: 19 mm
Die Orientation: 6 H
Weight: 3.61 g
No notes for this coin
RIC 362; BMC 421; Sear 4584
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/A052.jpg
An AR Denarius struck 141 AD in Rome
Obverse: DIVA FAVSTINA, Bust of Faustina I, draped, right, hair elaborately waved in several loops round head and drawn up and coiled on top

Reverse: AVGVSTA, Ceres, veiled, draped, standing front, head left, holding long torch, vertical, in right hand and raising fold of skirt in left

Diameter: 18 mm
Die Orientation: 6 H
Weight: 3.39 g
No notes for this coin
RIC III Antoninus Pius 362
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/A057.jpg
An AE As struck after 141 AD in Rome
Obverse: DIVA? AVG? FAVSTINA, Draped Bust right

Reverse: AETERNITAS, Pietas standing left, by altar, right hand raised, holding incense box in left hand; S-C in fields

Diameter: 26 mm
Die Orientation: 11 H
Weight: 8.44 g
RIC III Antoninus Pius 1161 obverse inscription is merely DIVA FAVSTINA, even with the short flan one can see FAVSTINA is fully at the right and more than just DIVA is at the left, ?A AVG is visible, presumably DIVA AVG, such an obverse exists as a Dupondius (but not with this reverse)
RIC III Antoninus Pius 1161 var. (Obv. Inscr.)
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/A064.jpg
An AE As struck 141 AD in Rome
Obverse: DIVA FAVSTINA, Bust of Faustina I, draped, right, hair elaborately waved and coiled in bands across head and drawn up at back and piled in a round coil on top

Reverse: AETERNITAS, Juno, veiled, draped, standing front, head left, raising right hand and holding scepter, vertical, in left; SC in fields

Diameter: 27 mm
Die Orientation: 11 H
Weight: 10.5 g
CNG dates this issue to circa 146-161 AD.
RIC III Antoninus Pius 1155 (as)
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/A066.jpg
An AR Denarius struck 141 AD in Rome
Obverse: DIVA FAVSTINA, Bust of Faustina I, draped, right, hair elaborately waved in several loops round head and drawn up and coiled on top

Reverse: CONSECRATIO, Peacock, walking right, head turned back left

Diameter: 18 mm
Die Orientation: 6 H
Weight: 2.74 g
CNG dates to circa 146-161 AD
RIC III Antoninus Pius 384a (denarius)
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/Diva_Faustina_I_(Obv_and_Rev)_2.jpg
An AR Denarius struck after AD 141 in Rome
Obverse: DIVA FAVSTINA, veiled and draped bust right

Reverse: CONSECRATIO, peacock walking right, head left

Diameter: 18 mm
Die Orientation: 5 H
Weight: 3.54 g

Beloved wife of the emperor Antoninus Pius, Annia Galeria Faustina was Augusta for just two years before she died in AD 141. Evidently distraught, Pius had her deified on an extensive series of commemorative coins, unprecedented in it’s scale and duration (at least a decade). In addition to the coinage, a temple was built in her honour in the Roman Forum. The legend on the obverse of this beautiful silver denarius reads ‘Diva Faustina’ and indicates her deification (Diva = ‘Divine’). On the reverse is a peacock; a bird associated to the Romans with the goddess Juno. Together with Jupiter and Minerva, Juno was worshipped in Rome as part of the Capitoline Triad of supreme deities. Goddess of marriage and childbirth, she was the protector and special counsellor of the state, and took a further role in safeguarding the women of Rome. That the peacock is specifically linked to Juno is affirmed in myth by Ovid in his Metamophoses, Book 1, where he relates the story of Jupiter, his lover Io, and his jilted wife Juno. Ovid tells us that after Jupiter was caught by his lover, she was turned into a pure white heifer by his enraged wife and set under the guard of Argus, the hundred-eyed watchman. Sent by Jupiter to free Io, Mercury distracted Argus by playing the pan-pipes and telling stories, eventually slaying the giant and freeing Io. To honour her faithful watchman, Ovid tells us that Juno transferred Argus’ eyes to the tail feathers of the peacock so as to preserve them forever. The peacock’s tail, circular like the vault of heaven when spread and jewelled as with stars, made the bird a natural symbol of the sky to which the dead ascend and hence of apotheosis and immortality. A fitting reverse therefore, to highlight Faustina’s place amongst the divine. Ex. Roma Numismatics E-Sale 74; Lot 914; Ex. Jesus Vico S.A. (2 March 1989); Lot 143.

RIC 384b (Pius); RSC 176; BMCRE 476
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/Faustina_Galerius.jpg
An AE As struck 147-161 AD in Cyprus
Obverse: draped bust of Faustina I right; ΘEA ΦAY_CTEINA

Reverse: draped bust of M. Annius Galerius Antoninus right; M ΓAΛEPIOC ANTWNINOC AYTOKPATOPOC ANTWNINOY YIOC

Diameter: -
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 11.7 g
Possibly struck in Rome for Cyprus
Overbeck, Galerius 6; Parks 22; Vagi 1517; Lindgren III 940