T. Carisius Moneyer of the Roman Republic from 46 BC to 46 BC.
Titus Carisius was one of the moneyers for the year 46 BC.

Carisius is possibly identical to the Carisius who defeated the Astures in Hispania in 25 BC, and took their chief town, Lancia.

In consequence of his cruelty and insolence, the Astures took up arms again in 22.
T. Carisius
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/T_Carisius.jpg
An AR Denarius struck 46 BC in Rome
Obverse: head of Roma right wearing ornate helmet, ROMA

Reverse: cornucopia on celestial globe, scepter left, rudder right all within wreath, T·CARISI

Diameter: -
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 4.3 g
No notes for this coin
Crawford 464/3a, RSC I Carisia 4, BMCRR Rome 4065, Sydenham 984a, SRCV I 448
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/CarisiaCroped2.png
An AR Denarius struck 46 BC in Rome
Obverse: Head of Juno Moneta right; MONETA downwards in left field.

Reverse: Implements for coining money: anvil die with garlanded punch die above, tongs and hammer on either side; T•CARISIVS above; all within laurel wreath.

Diameter: 20 mm
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 3.74 g
"A temple to Juno Moneta (or Juno "the Advisor") was dedicated on the Capitoline Hill in 344 BC and its grounds served as Rome's first mint. The association between this temple and minting of coinage was such that the English words "money" and "monetary" derive from "moneta."

Provenance: Jesus Vico S.A, Auction 150 (1 March 2018), lot 414. Ex Herrero (25 March 1993), lot 78.
Crawford 464/2
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/1303_464_Carisius.JPG
An AR Denarius struck 46 BC in Rome
Obverse: head of Sibyla Herophile right

Reverse: sphinx seated right; T·CARISIVS / III·VIR

Diameter: -
Die Orientation: -
Weight: -
No notes for this coin
Crawford 464/1, SRCV I 321, Sydenham 983, RSC I Carisia 11
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/edited3.png
An AR Denarius struck 46 BC in Rome
Obverse: Head of Roma right, wearing ornate helmet; ROMA behind.

Reverse: Scepter, cornucopia on globe, and rudder; T • CARISI below; all within laurel wreath.

Diameter: 18 mm
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 3.61 g
The moneyer himself is more or less unknown and the little we know from Cassius Dio may actually be wrong. According to Cassius Dio, Titus Carisius defeated the Astures in Hispania, and took their chief town, Lancia, circa 25 BC; but in consequence of his cruelty and insolence, the Astures took up arms again in 22 BC.

There are coins in which Titus Carisius is identified as triumvir monetalis, and another which mentions Publius Carisius, as legatus and propraetor, together with the word Emerita, apparently referring to the town of Augusta Emerita in Lusitania, which the emperor Augustus established for the emeriti, veterans of the war in Hispania. From this it has been conjectured that the praenomen Titus, assigned to the conqueror of the Astures by Cassius Dio, should instead be Publius.

Provenance: Triton XXII (9 January 2019), lot 912. From the Alan J. Harlan Collection, purchased from Freeman & Sear. Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 33 (5 April 2006), lot 339.
Crawford 464/3c
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/edited4.png
An AR Denarius struck 46 BC in Rome
Obverse: Head of Sibyl Herophile right, hair elaborately decorated with jewels and enclosed in a sling, tied with bands.

Reverse: Sphinx seated right; T • CARISIVS above, III • VIR in exergue.

Diameter: 19 mm
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 3.8 g
"This evocative type demonstrates that Roman moneyers were quite familiar with the legends and coin types of obscure Greek cities. The city of Gergis in Troas, near the site of ancient Troy, was said to be the birthplace of the Sibyl Herophile, a priestess with prophetic powers. Coins of the city struck circa 350-300 BC depict a head of the Sibyl on the obverse and a seated sphinx, symbol of prophecy, on the reverse. The types are repeated here, surely intended as a nod to the Trojan origins of Julius Caesar's gens."

Provenance: Ex Aureo & Calicó Auction 319 – Alba Longa, vol. I (7 November 2018), lot 223, Ex Sotheby's "Greek and Roman coins" (28 October 1993), lot 1385.
Crawford 464/1