Philip II Junior Emperor of the Roman Empire from 247 to 249.
Marcus Julius Philippus Severus, also known as Philippus II, Philip II and Philip the Younger, was the son and heir of the Roman Emperor Philip the Arab by his wife Roman Empress Marcia Otacilia Severa.

When his father became emperor in 244, the younger Philip was appointed Caesar. In 247 he became consul, and was later elevated by his father to the rank of Augustus and co-ruler.

His father was killed in battle by his successor Decius in 249. When news of this death reached Rome, Philip was murdered by the Praetorian Guard. He died in his mother's arms, aged twelve years.
Philip II Junior
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An AR Tetradrachm struck 249 AD in Antioch
Obverse: laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right from behind; AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB

Reverse: eagle right, wreath in beak; ΔHMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠATO Δ ANTIOXIA / S C

Diameter: -
Die Orientation: -
Weight: -
No notes for this coin
McAlee 1042; Prieur 474
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An AE unit struck 245-247 AD in Bizya
Obverse: bare head right; M IOVΛ ΦIΛIΠΠOC KAIC

Reverse: Silenos walking right naked with tail, pours wine from wineskin on his shoulders into large krater; BIZV_H (NWN)

Diameter: -
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 3.52 g
No notes for this coin
Youroukova 157; Voegtli -; Mionnet suppl. II, pg. 238, 195
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An AE unit struck 247-249 AD in Thessalonica
Obverse: radiate and draped bust right from behind; MAP IOYΛIOC ΦIΛIΠΠOC KE

Reverse: tetrastyle temple seen in prospective (3/4 left); ΘECCAΛONIKEΩN ΠYΘIA

Diameter: -
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 5 g
No notes for this coin
obv, Varbanov.4740; rev. Varbanov 4710
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An AR Antoninianus struck 245-246 AD in Rome
Obverse: M IVL PHILIPPVS CAES

Reverse: PRINCIPI IVVENT - Philip, in military attire, standing left holding globe and resting on spear

Diameter: 0 mm
Die Orientation: 0 H
Weight: 0 g
No notes for this coin
Sear:9240 RIC:218d
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An AR Antoninianus struck 245 AD in Rome
Obverse: M IVL PHILIPPVS CAES, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right

Reverse: PRINCIPI IVVENT, Philip II, in military dress, standing right with globe & transverse spear

Diameter: 0 mm
Die Orientation: 0 H
Weight: 3.95 g
No notes for this coin
RIC 216c, RSC 54
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An AE unit struck 249 AD in Nisibis
Obverse: radiate and cuirassed bust left; AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB

Reverse: facing seated statue of Tyche, ram to the right with head left above and river-god swimming to the right below, all inside tetrastyle temple temple with arched central bay; IOV CEΠ KOΛΩ NECIBI MHT

Diameter: -
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 8 g
Jul/Aug 249 AD
BMC 22 corr. (Philip I); SNG Copenhagen 240 corr. (same); SNG Hunterian 2448-50
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An AE unit struck 244-249 AD in Sillyum
Obverse: AV K M IO CEOV ΦIΛIΠΠOC CE, Bust of Philip facing right, wearing laurel wreath, cuirass, and drapery

Reverse: CIΛΛVEΩN, Tyche standing face left, holding rudder and cornucopia

Diameter: 26 mm
Die Orientation: 12 H
Weight: 9.94 g
No notes for this coin
SNG France 1001
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An AE unit struck 244-247 AD in Deultum
Obverse: Laureate head right; M IVL PH_ILIPPVS CAE

Reverse: Lion right; C F / P D

Diameter: 0 mm
Die Orientation: 0 H
Weight: 3 g

ex CNG

Draganov 1931 (O175/R663); Youroukova 508; Varbanov 3129
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An AR Antoninianus struck 244-245 AD in Rome
Obverse: radiate, draped bust right from behind; M IVL PHILIPPVS CAES

Reverse: Jupiter standing, holding scepter and thunderbolt; IOVI CONSERVAT

Diameter: -
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 3.75 g
1st - 2nd emission
SRCV III 9238, RIC IV 213, RSC IV 13
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An AE unit struck 244-247 AD in Bizya
Obverse: M IOVΛ ΦIΛIΠΠOC KAICAP, bare-headed bust of Philip II.

Reverse: BIZVHNΩN, Thanatos (god of death) or weary Eros extinguishing torch.

Diameter: 17.74 mm
Die Orientation: 7 H
Weight: 3.32 g
Rare. Philip II (238–249) was the son and heir of the Roman Emperor Philip the Arab by his wife Marcia Otacilia Severa. When his father became emperor in 244, the younger Philip was appointed Caesar. In 247 he became consul, and was later elevated by his father to the rank of Augustus and co-ruler. Philip I 'The Arab' was killed in battle by his successor Trajan Decius in 249. When news of this death reached Rome, Philip II was murdered by the Praetorian Guard. He died in his mother's arms, aged twelve years. Worth noting that, only according to numismatic evidence, he had a sister called Julia Severa or Severina, whom the extant literary sources do not mention, and a brother, Quintus Philippus Severus. Thanatos, in ancient Greek religion and mythology, the personification of death. Thanatos was the son of Nyx, the goddess of night, and the brother of Hypnos, the god of sleep. He appeared to humans to carry them off to the underworld when the time allotted to them by the Fates had expired. His touch was gentle, likened to that of his twin brother Hypnos (Sleep). Violent death was the domain of Thanatos' blood-craving sisters, the Keres, spirits of slaughter and disease. Thanatos was once defeated by the warrior Heracles, who wrestled him to save the life of Alcestis, the wife of Admetus, and he was tricked by Sisyphus, the king of Corinth, who wanted a second chance at life. Thanatos plays a prominent role in two myths. Once when he was sent to fetch Alkestis (Alcestis) to the underworld, he was driven off by Herakles in a fight. Another time he was captured by the criminal Sisyphos (Sisyphus) who trapped him in a sack so as to avoid death. In Greek vase painting Thanatos was depicted as a winged, bearded older man, or more rarely as a beardless youth. He often appears in a scene from the Iliad, opposite his brother Hypnos (Sleep) carrying off the body of Sarpedon. In Roman sculptural reliefs he was portrayed as a youth holding a down-turned torch and wreath or butterfly which symbolised the soul of the dead.
BMC 15, Moushmov 3519.
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An AE Pentassarion struck AD 247-249 in Marcianopolis
Obverse: M IOVΛIOC ΦIΛIΠΠOC KAICAP, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust of Philip right, facing draped bust of Serapis left, wearing kalathos

Reverse: MAPKIANOΠOΛEITΩN, bearded serpent coiled left; E (mark of value) to right

Diameter: 27 mm
Die Orientation: 1 H
Weight: 12.42 g
The serpent seen on the reverse of this bronze pentassarion from Marcianopolis (now Devnya, in Bulgaria) is a snake god known as ‘Glykon’. A cult that worshipped the snake god was introduced by the Greek prophet, Alexander of Abonutichus, in the mid-second century AD. The contemporary writings of Greek satirist Lucian of Samosata (c. AD 120-190) were extremely hostile, and comical, on the subject of Alexander and his snake cult. In his essay titled "Alexander the Oracle Monger" Lucian describes the protagonist as a false prophet and explains that the cult is a hoax with the Glykon god being nothing more than a hand-puppet! The cult itself was real enough, and an impressive and beautiful marble statue of the Glykon was discovered in 1962 in Constanta, Romania. The statue dates from the 2nd century and is currently the only cult statue of the deity known throughout the Roman Empire. The snake had some human features, such as hair and ears, and on this coin we can see that the snake has been given a beard. The cult may have originated in Macedonia, and spread beyond the Aegean by the mid second century AD. As with other snake cults, the focus of worship at the temple was fertility. Women would bring offerings to Glykon to increase their chances of becoming pregnant. According to Lucian, Alexander also had more ‘conventional’ methods of ensuring the Glykon worshippers became pregnant....
Varbanov 2102
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An AE unit struck 247-249 AD in Bostra
Obverse: radiate bust right from behind; MARC IVL PHILIPPOS CESAR

Reverse: wreath; COL METROPOLIS BOSTRA AKTI / A ΔOV / CAPIA

Diameter: 28 mm
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 14.7 g
No notes for this coin
Sofaer 54; Kindler 46a; Spijkerman 60; Rosenberger 52