M. Junius D.f. Silanus Moneyer of the Roman Republic from 145 BC to 145 BC.
Marcus Junius D. f. D. n. Silanus was a member of the Junii Silani, a noble Roman family, who held the consulship in 109 BC.

He was a moneyer in 145 BC, and is probably identical with the tribune of the people Marcus Junius D. f., who introduced in 124 or 123 BC a law against exploitative Roman governors (lex Iunia)

In 109 BC Silanus was elected consul, as the fist member of the Junii Silani. He was in office alongsode Quintus Caecilius Metellus Numidicus.

Silanus fought the Cimbri at an unknown location in Gallia Transalpina and was defeated.
M. Junius D.f. Silanus
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/iuniusCroped.jpg
An AR Denarius struck 145 BC in Rome
Obverse: Helmeted head of Roma right, ass's head to left; X (mark of value) below chin.

Reverse: The Dioscuri riding right; M•IVNI below, ROMA in exergue.

Diameter: 18 mm
Die Orientation: 3 H
Weight: 4.12 g
"Because there are only few and short sources about the history of the Roman Republic in the second half of the second century BC, we have to rely on suppositions as to which public offices Silanus held before his consulate. He is probably identical with the tribune of the people Marcus Iunius D. f., who introduced in 124 or 123 BC a law against exploitative Roman governors (lex Iunia), which preceded the lex Acilia repetundarum of the tribune Manius Acilius Glabrio (123 or 122 BC). In 113 or 112 BC Silanus was perhaps praetor in Spain.

In 109 BC Silanus achieved to become consul as the first member of his family, the Iunii Silani. He held this highest public office together with Quintus Caecilius Metellus Numidicus, who had to continue the war against Jugurtha, king of Numidia, whereas Silanus undertook to fight against the Cimbri. To increase the power of Rome Silanus abolished the exemptions from the military service. Probably before their battle with the consul the traveling Cimbri had asked to be given a domicile on Roman territory, but the Senate had declined their request. Silanus then rushed towards the Cimbri with his army but he was defeated at an unknown location in Gallia Transalpina.

In 104 BC the tribune of the people Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus accused Silanus of his military failure, but the former consul was acquitted."

Provenance: Bertolami Fine Arts, E-Live Auction 49 (12 November 2017), lot 636.
Crawford 220/1
/Files/Images/Coinsite/CoinDB/1408_Junius_Silanus2.jpg
An AR Denarius struck 146 (145)BC in Rome
Obverse: head of Roma right wearing winged helmet, ass head left; X

Reverse: Dioscuri on horses right holding spears and reins; M·IVNI / ROMA

Diameter: -
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 3.6 g
No notes for this coin
Crawford 220/1, SRCV I 96, Sydenham 408, RSC I Junia 8