Coins from Kingdom of England
The Kingdom of England was a sovereign state on the island of Great Britain from the 10th century, when it emerged from various Anglo-Saxon kingdoms, until 1707, when it united with Scotland to form the Kingdom of Great Britain.

In the early 10th century the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms were united by Æthelstan (r. 927–939). In 1016 the kingdom became part of the North Sea Empire of Knut the Great, a personal union between England, Denmark and Norway. The Norman conquest of England in 1066 led to the transfer of the English capital city and chief royal residence from the Anglo-Saxon one at Winchester to Westminster, and the City of London quickly established itself as England's largest and principal commercial centre.

Histories of the kingdom of England from the Norman conquest of 1066 conventionally distinguish periods named after successive ruling dynasties: Norman 1066–1154, Plantagenet 1154–1485, Tudor 1485–1603 and Stuart 1603–1714 (interrupted by the Interregnum (England) of 1649–1660). Dynastically, all English monarchs after 1066 ultimately claim descent from the Normans; the distinction of the Plantagenets is merely conventional.
Kingdom of England
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An AR Short-cross penny struck 978 - 1016 AD in Winchester
Obverse:

Reverse:

Diameter: -
Die Orientation: -
Weight: -
No notes for this coin
No references provided for this coin
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An AR Long-cross penny struck 1299-1301 AD in London
Obverse:

Reverse:

Diameter: 18 mm
Die Orientation: 0 H
Weight: 1.35 g
No notes for this coin
Spink 1408
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An AR Long-cross penny struck 1216-1272 AD in Canterbury
Obverse: HENRICVS REX III / Crowned facing bust, sceptre in right hand

Reverse: ROB ERT ONC ANT /

Diameter: -
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 1.33 g
Moneyer Robert
5c2
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An AR Long-cross penny struck 1247-1279 AD in London
Obverse:

Reverse:

Diameter: -
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 1.47 g
Moneyer Henri
5c
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An AR Long-cross penny struck 1216-1272 AD in London
Obverse: hENRICUS REX:III / crowned facing bust

Reverse: NIC/OLC/ONL/VND / voided long cross, with trefoil in each quarter

Diameter: -
Die Orientation: -
Weight: -
From The Brussels Hoard Type 3d1
No references provided for this coin
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An AR Penny struck 1422-1427 in Calais
Obverse: HENRICVS REX ANGLIE, Crowned bust of Henry facing, annulets in fields

Reverse: VILLA CALIS, Long cross, three pellets in each quadrant, an anulet also in the 1st and 4th quadrants

Diameter: 18 mm
Die Orientation: 12 H
Weight: 0.8 g

King of England and disputed King of France
AR Penny, Calais mint

S 1845
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An AR Denier struck 1172-1189 in Bordeaux?
Obverse: +|RICA|RDVS|ω.in two lines across field, cross above, ω below.

Reverse: +AQVITANIE, Cross pattee within inner circle.

Diameter: 18.51 mm
Die Orientation: 0 H
Weight: 0.86 g
Silver Denier as Duke of Aquitane. Richard I (1157-1199), known also as Richard the Lionheart, was the second son of Henry II. He became Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou in 1172, but was later forced to surrender Aquitaine to his mother, Eleanor by 1185. Richard became King of England on Henry's death in 1189, but spent little of his reign in England, because he was either on crusade or held prisoner. He was killed at the siege of Chalus in France in 1199.All of the coins minted in England during Richard's reign are of a design introduced by his father and carry the name Henry. The only coins to have Richard's name on them were minted in France.
Elias 4; Poey d
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An AR Denier struck 1189-1199 AD in Poitou Comte
Obverse: + RICARDVS REX; around Cross

Reverse: PIC / TAVIE / NSIS in three lines

Diameter: 19 mm
Die Orientation: -
Weight: 0.94 g
The coins struck by Richard the Lionheart in his French possession are the only coins to bear his name. His English coinage was struck in the name of his father HENRICVS. Richard I was a key leader in the Third Crusade. He captured Cyprus, and aided in the capture of Acre in 1191 AD. He also defeated Saladin's forces at the Battle of Arsuf in Septemberof 1191, and fought the great kurdish general to a stalemate. He and Saladin finally came to a settlement in September 1192 AD which included an agreement allowing Christian access to Jerusalem. It also included a three-year truce.
B. 424; P.A. 2505; Elias 8; D. 920